MISSION OF THE GALACTIC INSPECTORATE

THIS IS A TRANSLATION INTO ENGLISH OF THE REPORT BY GALACTIC ROBOTS MANY DECADES FROM NOW. DATES, TIMES AND LOCATIONS ARE ALL BEYOND OUR COMPREHENSION AS THEY HAVE DIFFERENT CODES FOR MEASUREMENTS IN THE MILKY WAY.

MISSION OF THE GALACTIC INSPECTORATE

REPORT FOR |||/|…/\\…|||

Rocket carefully circled Planet ||| (Earth) many times. Much metallic satellite rubbish floating in planet’s surrounding space. Satellites evidently used for communication by developed species. Mission’s extending grasper picked up larger satellite unit and examined its weird operations. Decoding imprints on titanium surface to be be done later. So would structure of hard to decipher operating system of originators.

Coming closer to surface of Planet ||| which circles its star while spinning at steady speed. Complicated by murky atmosphere. Immediately evident unusually high levels of carbon-dioxide. Also radioactivity. Our observing onboard mechanisms recorded imbalance of magnetism of poles. Same for imbalance of planetary mass.

Several flares coming from limited volcanic activity observable. Also lightening strikes in northern hemisphere. No other lights of any kind. Small fires as are often visible on other formerly prominent planets. With this affirmation there would be no trouble when/if landing made.

Expansive seas appear to be polluted. Violent storms scattered around center of hemisphere. Large crumbling structures huddle closely together in waters. Possibly may once have been ports. Large rusting floating metal forms, some having dozen levels, also visible.

Snooper launched to examine the surface. Here and there areas of vegetation amidst large tracts of sand, desert, and stringy stretches of concrete. Some cacti as well as various evergreen trees also evident. Snooper able to gather number of ants, termites and cockroaches. These only signs of life encountered on land.

Anything to learn from this planet? Carbon Dioxide levels above those of other deceased planets. Indicative of high over-populations.

Any prospects for future connections? Limited. Not in next 1,000 “light years.” Large orbiting asteroid likely to hit this planet in upcoming period.

Notable relics? Many primitive stone structures. Decaying, high steel constructions indicating consequences of over-population.

Comments: When last surveyed many light years ago there had been positive expectations from primitive species that had evolved. Tribal groups then had mastered fire. Their rapid advance led to being overwhelmed by extremes of pollution as well as technological warfare and plutonium levels from which no recovery.

II

REPORT FOR |||/|…/\\…||||

Landing on Planet |||| (Mars). Rocky and barren planet indeed. No signs of any life. Low oxygen levels. Low carbon dioxide.

Three separate groups of small structures inspected. These fitted with electronic machinery. Everything covered with ageing dust – even piles of trash. Each group had three or four parked large “winged” rockets. Most probably for travel to and from Planet |||.

Massive empty metal and plastic containers to hold water. Evidence of unsuccessful extensive drilling. Also ashes from past fires evident.

No evidence of corpses but small mounds of rubble, rocks and sand topped with plastic red emblems and small colorful flags. This suggested burials.

Connection between two planets had come to abrupt end. Due to lack of food and agricultural failures on Planet |||| Also destructive nuclear conflict on Planet |||. This ended shipment of essentials needed for survival on ||||.

As star which warmed these planets slowly cools, range of evolutions essential for genetic breakthroughs in bio spectrum. This most unlikely for currently hot planets | (Mercury) and || (Venus) or remote colder ones.

Rocket will be going past largest of planets before escaping this star’s pull. Next headed for nearest galactic star’s potentially habitable planets.

This concludes planetary report for star |||/|…/\\…

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KEEPING IN TOUCH

We are living in a time when “keeping in touch” has never been more important. The dramatic advances in technology and electronics are deeply affecting the way we now regard touch. Electronics are altering our ways of feeling and being. Tapping on our mobiles and computers has begun to overtake touch as a way of communicating. The speed with which these changes are occurring is such that we hardly seem able to absorb their impact. I am not going to propose a resolution in this blog — I shall simply try to awaken readers to what is and may be happening.

The feminist #MeToo movement is declaring that men should not touch women without their consent. This revealed the depth of our current confusion as well as hypocrisy: We all touch each other every time we shake hands and our hands are among the most sensitive parts of our body.

Touch is one of the bases of social expressiveness in many cultures. In our effort to redress the long history of  unwanted aggressiveness and “touching” are we in danger of seeing indiscretion in every innocent gesture?

“I touch, therefore I am,” is integral to our being. Touch is essential in confirming our physical reality. It is also at the basis of “the common good” for both the self and our social relations. In the stories and videos of Joseph Biden, this candidate appears to be inflicted by an ignominious case of touchy-feeliness. Seven women came forward to claim that Biden had touched them in such a way as to make them feel uncomfortable. He has acknowledged that social norms have been transformed. His touching was his way of showing that he cares, but he recognized that the boundaries were being reset. Indeed, “If the thought of touching anyone in your office makes you shudder, then you will empathize with those who say hugging and kissing should be banned at work,” wrote one commentator.1

Most women in the advanced economies have experienced variations of inappropriate touching by over-familiar men. “Many women tolerate a range of creepiness from men who plead ignorance about what they are doing,” admitted Suzanne Moore.2 Touch can be an expression of intimacy but she writes that “unwanted touch is an expression of power.” Whatever the politically powerful may think they are doing, “they are actually embracing inequality. This doesn’t make women merely uncomfortable. It makes some of us rigid with anger.”

The effect on humans of touch can be so strong that even the lightest can have powerful effect. Studies have shown that waitresses “accidentally“ touching a customer while bringing the bill will receive bigger tips. Indeed, a passing touch can lift the mood of two people in a flash. Touch can release neurochemicals like endorphins and neurohormones such as oxytocin in the brain which heal feelings like anger, loneliness, and isolation. Nurturing touches, like hugs, can lift serotonin levels, elevating moods, relaxing muscles, and balance the nervous system.

How far have we moved since the expression of “Let’s keep in touch,” first came into use. Indeed some societies have entered an era of “Touch me not!” In general the role of touch in society has been demoted, according to Prof Steve Cole, of the UCLA School of Medicine. “We’re not necessarily designed for this distance,” Cole said. We should be able to touch each other without recrimination. Physical contact has been shown to help reduce stress and increase empathy.

Touch of the skin, or tactile sense, is the body’s shield and makes us aware of the environment which surrounds us, such as the temperature, pain, as well as the lightest breeze. Without this sensory system we would have no physical self-awareness. It would appear that the cognitive capacities of touch, which was among the first of the sensory systems to evolve, are only recently being appreciated. Touch leaves a memory trace that persists long after the physical experience is gone. As a consequence, memories of touch can manifest in curious ways. For example we may not be able to verbalize how something felt, but we might be able to recognize it later: a single touch can have a far greater impact on the mind than we acknowledged at the time. It was quite different in the past.

In the Middle Ages, it was believed in the Royal Kingdoms that a touch from the King could heal scrofula, a swelling of the lymph nodes in the neck caused by tuberculosis. This practice began with King Edward the Confessor in England and Philip I in France. Subsequent French and English Kings continued a practice which was supposed to demonstrate that the right to rule was God-given. In splendid ceremonies these kings touched hundreds of the afflicted who also received special gold coins called “touchpieces” which were often worn as amulets. By the late 1400s it was believed that the ill could be cured by touching coins called “Angels” which had been handled by the monarch. King Henry IV of France was said to have touched up to 1,500 at one session. Queen Anne, who died in 1714, was the last English monarch to hand out such gold embossed medallions, but in France the practice continued until Charles X ended it in 1825.

I have been deeply moved by a story in Granta magazine by “Poppy” Sebag-Monfefiore who reported on her experiences being touched in China and Asia.3 She started: “Every day I was touched. Many times, by friends, by strangers, by a lady who swept the street by the courtyard where I lived. By water sellers, restaurateurs, by old men playing chess, by people I didn’t know. Most I would never meet again. I was handled, pushed, pulled, leaned upon, stroked, my hand was held. And it was through these small, intimate, gestural moments that I began to get a hold on how macro changes imprinted themselves onto people’s relationships and inner lives.”

Poppy described the way “Touch had its own language.” I shall not repeat her extremely moving experiences of touch in public which “had a whole range of tones that were neither sexual nor violent.” (But were not neutral either). The way an elderly man used her body to help him stand is something I should like everyone to read in Granta. For Poppy usually “touch was like a lubricant that eased the day-to-day goings-on….”

How I wish this could happen in our fear-filled English speaking cultures. For all my adult life I have felt both urged and privileged to touch the stomachs of expectant mothers. Of course I ask permission and it is rare that women refuse. I consider it is an honor to be in contact with the miracle of life itself and women are proud to share one of the most important of all human experiences.

In his studies of emotional signaling  Matthew J Hertenstein suggests that humans can communicate numerous emotions with touch and can decode anger, disgust, fear, gratitude, love and sympathy via touch.4

The Collective branded as mindbodygreen believe the pillars of wellness are interconnected and are integral for our shared journey in which touching  and hugging are a powerful way of healing. Despite the resistance to touch from some quarters, there also is broad appreciation and celebration in others: the just opened “Please Touch Museum” in Philadelphia focuses on the ability of children and parents to focus on the variety of ways we can touch. So some touches are advancing us all!

“We’re post-touch, post-truth. How will society communicate now?” asks Poppy Sebag-Montefiore. Not by ever more rapid systems but only by greater appreciation and understanding of our sentient beings can we return to the open enjoyments of touching .


1Rhiannon Lucy Cosslett., The Guardian, April 25, 2019

2Suzanne Moore, “This touching is about power,” The Guardian, April

3Poppy Sebag-Montefiore, “Touch” in Granta Winter 2019, The Politics of Feeling, pp.17-28

4Matthew J.Hertenstein,  The Handbook of Touch: Neuroscience,Behavioral and Health Perspectives (2011)

Noise

Noise has become a universal environmental problem which we haven’t a clue how to tackle. Enter the streets of any major city in the world and you will be swept along by continuing noises. But do we truly need to be exposed to such uncontrolled electronic noise levels?

  • Have you ever gone into a restaurant where the noise was so disturbing that you wanted to get out?
  • Have you entered an underground train where the noise was so powerful you wished you had earplugs?
  • Have you experienced such pandemonium at a party that you went to the bathroom just to escape?

None of these were questions which would have been posed in the 19th century. The truth is that noise can be “a stench in the ear” as the wit Ambrose Bierce described back in 1906.

Until the industrial revolution, noise had seldom been regarded as a social threat. As long as noise was a natural phenomenon people were not offended: the sound of horse-drawn carriages or the rolling of beer barrels was not noxious. The ringing of bells was welcome. Everything changed with the introduction of trains, cars, airplanes and the various electrically driven machines ranging from telephones to television. Noise became intrusive as well as a threat to our well being.

In today’s world we have almost forgotten the pleasures of calm, quiet and silence.  These states of being have become harder and harder to come by.  Peace and quiet have come to be regarded as luxuries enjoyed by those living on secluded islands or in gated and walled compounds. Given such a state of affairs, a number of social scientists think peace and quiet should become a human right.

 In recent decades American and European restaurants are being overwhelmed by high decibels of background noise.  Such cacophony becomes a social killer, keeping talk and discussions down to a minimum. I often ask a waiter or manager to please lower the volume, but the result is usually unnoticeable.

The top complaint of diners in the US is noise. The typical  restaurant “background noise” is around 65 decibels . Customers begin to raise their voices at 70 db and conversation becomes difficult at 75 db.1 I would recommend restaurants with a “Three-star Quiet Award” (unknown until now)  but a few reviewers have begun to warn readers of the noise levels along with the ups and downs of the cuisine. “Quiet Restaurants” would be a good beginning. Silence on trains has also been introduced in some trains (“quiet carriages”) but without much appreciation.

It would be good to make “all the right noises “ but noise is composed of many unwanted sounds. The foundation of this problem is that in modern times unwelcome noise has spread widely, loudly and endlessly. The noises made by automobiles and airplanes generally disturb us the most. Purportedly road traffic is not defined as a noise nuisance. The courts have declared it as “subjective” because there are varying decibel levels that people can withstand. Screeching automobile brakes are horrid and arresting. Screeching infants can be highly distracting but are somehow acceptable. So one must conclude that machine noises are alien and natural noises are almost acceptable.

The World Health Organization reports that irritation with noise has led 8 million people in Europe to place traffic noise claims with their local authorities. This leads us to ask why noise levels aren’t set in law? New York was the first city in the US to enact a noise code, but unlike air pollution or water pollution, noise does not leave any traces in the environment. There are some local laws regarding noisy neighbors who defy an acceptable decibels level, but residents should have stricter statutory legal rights.

In the UK neither the Noise Act of 1996 nor the Anti-Social Behavior Act of 2014 have brought much peace and quiet. Shrill noises can trigger the release of cortisol, a stress hormone. Annually half a million people who suffer from noise nuisances make complaints to their local councils. I know from friends in London how maddening the  constant flights from Heathrow airport can be. The noise is so intrusive that it has become a raging political issue. The eardrums of close to a million Londoners are affected by the roar of jet engines.

Regrettably, noise has spread everywhere. While the rich pay for quiet, the poor have to bear the noises surrounding them. Escaping to calmer public places in the city is challenging. Antonella Radicchi , a Berlin soundscape scientist, has created an app called “Hush City” so people can find places which are quiet in their settings. She has expanded her app so that city dwellers in the US, the UK, Germany, Italy and Spain may enjoy the more secluded spots of  our congested cities.

Little has been designed by builders, architects or developers who had noise in mind. Noise absorbing pavements and soundproof building materials are rare. The extent to which inhabitants in Europe and North America go to escape into their own protected sound worlds is impressive. All those who travel and walk about with earbuds, or more massive noise cancelling headphones, do so not only to listen to music but also to cut out noise.

I have written this blog because I would like to encourage more concerted efforts towards a quieter world and not a mechanically and ever more obtrusively noisy planet.

For more insights into noise and how it affects us, listen to this podcast on Cacophony at Jared Blumenfeld’s Podship Earth.


In noisy technoville

Cars are screeching while radios, TV and loudspeakers
are merely shrill;
Saws, blenders and washing machines are
Humming and buzzing wih skill
Alas, the ringing of bells becomes rarer and rarer.

In noisy technoville
Phones are ringing, jackhammer workers drilling
while speakers are screaming, Siri is merely being
appealing.
*Yet one of the least noted of human clicks
Are those rare misadventures of dentures creaking.

*With thanks to the immortal writings of Willard R. Espy, Words at Play (1975)


1Richard Goodwin, “Why noise is killing us,” The Guardian, July 3, 2018

WHY IS THERESA MAY STILL IN OFFICE?

As an American reporter covering the scene in the UK for the past fifty years, I am astounded that such a divisive, obdurate and short-sighted figure should still be leading the Conservative Party after four years of ineptitude. How can this be? The former Minister of the Treasury had portrayed her, following her snap election as “a dead woman walking.”

I first observed Theresa as a vengeful fighter some eight years ago when, as Home Secretary, she took on the police, cutting 20,000 from its ranks without considering the consequences. The effects have been disastrous, but she has evaded being held responsible for her actions.

Immigrants — who unlike the police, have no union, no funds, and no organization — were another group whose numbers she wanted to reduce. She professed to support immigration while creating a “hostile environment” which served to erode social cohesion in the country. During her time in the Home Office, it became possible to be hostile to Jamaicans who had been formally invited to work in the UK in 1962. The treatment of “Windrush” group’s members was so embarrassingly disgraceful that even Theresa finally had to publicly apologize last year.

As Home Secretary, her general approach to civil liberties could at best be described as careless. For example, after various extended consultations with “experts” she pledged to withdraw from the European Convention on Human Rights and was only deterred from this misguided effort by the intervention of Brexit .

Amidst the political infighting which followed the Referendum, Theresa was selected by Conservatives as the least objectionable of the contesting candidates to become their Prime Minister. Overnight she became a devout convert to Brexit after she personally had voted to remain in the European Union. She became beholden to the extremist Leavers who had become most prominent in the Conservative party. Since then, without considering the possible negative consequences, Theresa has been steadfast in pushing for the UK’s exit from the European Union.

In an extremely foolish move she called for a snap election in 2017 expecting that she would increase her majority in Parliament. Instead she nearly lost and became dependent upon the ten members of the DUP delegation to stay in power. Since that time, she has been determined to keep to her “red lines” no matter what. This has prevented her from looking after the well-being of the nation.

Teresa has continued as Prime Minister primarily because there is no prominent figure, not even within the extremists in the so-called “European Research Group”, who wants to take over the agonizing job of concluding Parliament’s Brexit nightmare.

The “ERG” succeeded last autumn to gather the 48 members of the parliamentary Conservative party necessary to trigger a challenge to the Prime Minister’s tenure. However when it came to a vote by all Tory MPs, she received an endorsement of 200 in her favor and only 117 against. Under the Party’s regulations, this meant, Theresa could not be challenged again from within for an entire year.

The absence of a truly popular leader in a divided Parliament worked in her behalf. Most politicians would have had the good sense to resign if they suffered a 432 to 202 defeat in Parliament as this stubborn Prime Minister did this year. Not Theresa! She has plodded-on with weak promises of “short delays” to be followed by further tactics to postpone conclusive Parliamentary votes for as long as possible in order to avoid defeat and cover her inability to come up with a satisfactory agreement with the European Union.

Only now are the ardent Brexiteers slowly beginning to acknowledge that her administration is a failure. However, she seems to be oblivious to what might lie ahead: If Britain does leave the European Union, the subsequent breakup of the United Kingdom might be in the cards. Theresa, who has seriously lacked vision has irresponsibly side-lined the Scots. Most likely the Scottish Nationalists would decide to hold another referendum and because of a floundering and economically desperate United Kingdom, it would most likely succeed.

We are not there yet, but Theresa (who cannot bear any talk of the extension of Article 50’s deadline) may finally have to admit that her strategy failed. This will put an end to the tenacious hold on power of an obstinate Prime Minister who never should have accepted the leadership of her party.

FACING UP TO A TROUBLED PLANET

The digital revolution could well be leading to a global breakdown of our faltering political, social and economic systems. Our increasingly populated planet is being pushed further and faster by automation and by the speed of change itself. These reckless advances go way beyond the irregularity of social developments over the past ten thousand years.

Troubling questions are being raised: Where are we headed (or beheaded)? What will be the dubious consequences of technological advance? How can we halt the growing inequality of inequalities? Are the racing advances in genetics threatening the human race? Are current robots going to be replaced by more clever bots? The questions multiply, but not always sensibly.

No one expects results from gathering elites, such as the annual sprinkled event in Davos, where the most powerful of the world’s corporate executives continue to push for the speed-up of automation. Although their overwhelming concern is profits, some intrude saying it is money. Profit is purportedly for their shareholders and the wealthy, but is essential for maintaining the status quo. The global inequalities and job losses may seem paramount to many, but as usual they were not tackled at Davos.

Yes, I too am a bit flummoxed when at breakfast I hear my wife asking questions of Siri on her mobile. Not that I am jealous, but it rattles me that she talks to Siri just as if that chat-bot were human. Later on in the day there are times I want to say to her: “Don’t ask me, I’m not Siri!” However, I am concerned that Apple may be recording such pseudo exchanges on the Internet for profit. Stolen surveillance, even of exchanges with chat-bots, is thriving globally. And that seems staggering when Tim Berners-Lee’s launch of the web was only thirty years ago. That’s real change.

Constant improvement seems like a societal pre-requisite, just like perpetual growth, but while both seem irresistible they are also cancerous. For example, do we need and do we want further and further technological advances regardless of how this may affect our lives? Do we really need more innovative gadgets? Faster computers? Crypto-coins? We see how plastics are floating with wild irresponsibility in the seven seas. We note how dangerous carbons are beginning to interfere with breathing. Around us ever-expanding soulless cities are affecting everything, even our spirits.

The advances of technology grant us incredible powers of communication which our predecessors never dreamt of, but then this has not helped dealing with matters like unwanted phone calls, cancelled flights, or computer sabotage. In my lifetime I have observed that with the advance of computers the ability of people to write, that is to even sign their names, is fast diminishing. I have also noted how our historical relationship to the horse has all but vanished, ending thousands of years of inter-dependency and inspiration. Today our sterile dependence on the automobile has absolutely no connection with nature.

And now it seems we are headed towards Artificial Intelligence with little concern for its impossible consequences. If AI becomes as popular and addictive as mobiles, this could lead to the slowing down of our minds and to a reluctance to interact socially with others. In a recent new book titled Re-Engineering Humanity it was projected that human beings could lose their self-sufficiency, their critical abilities and even their judgment. Others suggest ethics and morals might vanish like dandruff. Even our sexual behavior might be seriously undermined. Apparently, humanoid-robot bordellos are now operating for eager customers in Barcelona, Moscow, Toronto and Turin. New developments with robosexuals are unrolling as I write. Differentiating between digisexuals in the new world of Snapchat sexting is quite beyond me. A Ms Emily Witt writes that ”Digital sexuality allows for the possibility of anonymity, gender-bending, fetish play and other modes of experimentation with a degree of safety and anonymity that’s not present in the physical world.” Apparently there is great demand for ever-softer plastics.

We are faced not only with viral technologic advances but also with innovative destruction. Dozens of children’s apps (even in the friendly world of Peppa Pig for children under six) have become widely popular even though adults have little knowledge of what such viewing might mean for the dream life of these children. As a consequence of the fast speed of images on their screens, the focus of the young begins to turn off if the image lasts longer than about six seconds. The lifetime effects of this on younger generations are yet to be determined.

The wealthiest of our elites may underwrite investigations of social problems but will never institute anything which interferes with their own power. Profit comes first and the ultimate effects of the free market are tertiary. The deep transformational reforms that are essential aren’t recognized at all. For a long time I have wondered how humanity can sustain a working relationship between the confining aspects of a tired capitalism and the ideals of a steadily ageing democracy. Indeed we do not want to admit that this much maligned capitalism may be the root cause of most of our troubles.

More than a decade ago I offered an alternative to the current economic system with a new “Incentive Economy,” which stopped the use of money (to be exchanged with electronic payments) and replaced corporations with cooperatives. The reception to my radical ideas was more than hostile. Even NPR (National Public Radio) in the United States refused to review the book (on the grounds that its governmental funding might subsequently be affected.) What my daring Dollars or Democracy? advanced was simply rejected being unacceptably revolutionary.

Our digitally changing global challenges are spread so widely that just trying to list them is destabilizing: Washingtonian disinformation, mounting alpine inequalities, earthquake-like capitalist rumblings, early samplings of Artificial Intelligence, faster introduction of non-stuttering robots, plastic saturated stretches of the Pacific, mass migration of Central Americans northward, the prospects of yet another Wall Street-inspired economic fiasco, the possibilities of laboratory-cultivated plagues, the arousing underground military build-ups, never-mind the unpredictable environmental disasters, as well as our somewhat sick global liberalism — all add up to the prospect of an unstable future. I must admit that the sinister warnings of global climate change deniers on the possibly fatal costs of our ecosystems is almost as terrifying.

The frenetic Trumpian changes and dysfunctional Twitter imbalances are ever harder to digest. And that’s not all, the insecurity of the “left behind” is beginning to haunt us.
The current ineptitude of our political leaders is giving their globally forsaken, or “deplorables” the opportunity to increase their electoral numbers. Recent elections have shown that those who have no experience in government and are remarkably unfit for office are favored to win over those with experience, expertise, or ability. Aristotle suggested some 2,200 years ago that far preferable to elections, which give powers to the oligarchic, public office should be chosen through lots. In our time this would be through slot machines. That would give new political openings for those running the gambling casinos.

Citizen assemblies it is suggested could also offer an alternative to strongman politics. As has been amply demonstrated, outspoken populist figures, while staging dramatic interpretations on the challenges of our times, seldom come up with practical solutions. They contend that the plans for the meritocracy which developed over the past fifty years according to the formula “IQ + effort = merit” resulted in the devilish mechanism for the transmission of wealth and privilege across generations. The populist leaders believe “wealth – IQ = populist success.”

Production and consumption were, until recently, at the basis of our lives. Now, perhaps with tumultuous change, we shall have Artificial Intelligence and Robots in control while the richest humans (with little empathy) migrate to the Moon or Mars escaping this polluted planet. Ultimately, this would leave it for the unfit semi-bots to gradually disappear… from the Internet?

Note: Yorick’s latest book, FORWARD! is available from Amazon

ON RIGHTS AND WRONGS

There should be no shame in changing one’s mind on issues or apologizing for being wrong. These rigidly polarizing days, however, saying “sorry” or admitting one’s errors has become almost prohibited for politicians. As the Economist has noted it is rarely in the interest of those who are in power to pretend that they are never wrong.1

In writing this blog I freely admit I have been wrong on a number of occasions. I feel that unless one admits to the possibility of being wrong, there is less chance for change or improvement. I have been wrong on a wide variety aspects of life’s challenges. Although there is often not as much distance between right and wrong as I imagine, being “right” does not always lead to desired results and I know that what I consider to be wrong often can have positive consequences. I have to admit that while there is usually a right way and a wrong way, the wrong path sometimes seems more attractive to me.

I was seriously wrong, for example, when it came to the referendum in the UK on leaving Europe, but I felt at that time that the only way Europe could change and advance on such major issues as that of refugees or the rescue of the Greek economy was to shake up the overly bureaucratic and inept administration in Brussels. My argument, however, was quite different from that of the Brexit enthusiasts in the UK who thought this was the only way to liberate their country from the demands of the European Community. I speculated that if there was a strong voice to protest what was happening, change might occur without an unlikely vote for an exit. In being so seriously wrong, I did not recognize the negative effect the departure would have on all of Europe as well as on the UK.

I was equally wrong about Donald Trump’s chances of becoming President. I truly did not believe it was possible. I still can’t believe that such a large number of the American electorate could be so desperate and manifestly uninformed. Yes, I was wrong about the mental perspective of Americans living in the “rust-belt” of the United State. I was unaware how these people felt neglected, full of anger, painfully frustrated in their hopes for a better livelihood, and unable to come to terms with the intelligence of a black President. This exposed ignorance on my part and a lack of insightful reporting on the part of the media. Yes, I find it hard to recognize that 8 percent of America’s high school graduates can’t read or write.

It is also true that I have never been capable of appreciating the comparably miserable situation of the jobless German workers in 1932 who saw Adolf Hitler as the leader who could revitalize Germany. This mad Austrian, whose background was entirely alien, seemed preferable to the far more intelligent politicians of the time. I find it hard to accept that the electoral masses often find it difficult to cope with intellectuals. True, we all seem ready to disregard information or facts, which conflict with our strongly held views. Today, whatever economists or scientific experts demonstrate as being right has little effect on large segments of the population. This has become increasingly evident in the case of beliefs about climate change. It is not that people are blind or deaf, just that they don’t want to follow facts which run counter to their own beliefs.

I feel that I have been right about my opposition to and rejection of smoking and the use of brain destructive drugs. My concern with antibiotics, my fears of pollution, and my objections to nuclear weapons have all been evident in my blogs. I believe that our actions are right in proportion to the degree to which they improve the planet and produce happiness for human beings. Such actions are wrong when they result in wanton destruction, pain and misery. The nightmarish stockpiles of atomic and hydrogen bombs being held are insane. They may know it is wrong but the political leaders of this world are convinced that the only way to preserve their national positions is by holding masses of such weapons. Ultimately such a massive wrong may spell the end of mankind.


1“How to be wrong,” the Economist, June 10, 2017, p.74

HALTING THE DEREGULATIONS

The current political and economic systems hold profits ahead of other considerations so that large corporations, like Koch industries, can abuse both their workers and the environment in ways which should be controlled by state intervention in the form of regulations. However an army of lobbyists and vested interests in both Washington and London have been pushing to deregulate wherever possible.

We have been witnessing a sinister political and ideological transformation on government controls. There appears to be a desire in various segments of society for less state steering and regulation to be replaced with ever further freedom for both the market and privatization. Reducing the size of the government is one of the structural changes which are focused on the reduction, cutting or even closing down of numerous existing policies for ideological, political or economic reasons.

Following the economic crisis of 2008, the intense economic austerity programs imposed by different governments affected different aspects of society, including the dismantling of various social benefits, pensions, and controls over air and water pollution. The scaling back was camouflaged as “efficiency savings”, “cutting red tape”, “reform”, “retrenchment”, or “deregulation.” Such linguistic variations were motivated by obfuscating politicians searching for blame avoidance.1

Last February, President Trump signed an executive order to place “regulatory reform” task forces and officers within federal agencies in an effort to pare down the massive red tape of recent decades. Then in another executive order, ‘Reducing Regulation and Controlling Regulatory Costs,’ called for all government agencies to eliminate two existing regulations every time a new one is issued. Furthermore, the cost of any new regulation had to be offset by the two being removed. This order was swiftly renamed “one step forward, two steps back,” by many of those working in public health as well as other public services.

The ideologist and initially Trump’s top strategy advisor, Stephen Bannon, announced early on that his goal was “the deconstruction of the administrative state.” Fortunately he was fired, but conservatives still hoped that funding for regulations such as the Clean Air Act would be reduced as would those of drug and food safety groups. Indeed, the White House withdrew or removed from consideration some 800 proposed regulations that had never been activated by the Obama administration. Trump then identified some 300 regulations related to energy production and environmental protection that were spread across the Environmental Protection Agency as well as the Interior and Energy Departments. White House budget director Mick Mulvaney said these measures were to “slow the cancer that had come from regulatory burdens that we put on our people.” (But there were representatives of the gas and oil industries who cheered.)

Yogin Kothari of the Union of Concerned Scientists countered that “Six months into the administration the only accomplishments the President has had is to rollback, delay and rescind science based safeguards.” The administration’s regulatory agenda revealed its objective. Kothari insisted that ”It continues to perpetuate a false narrative that regulations only have costs and no benefits.”

More broadly, “dismantling” incorporates a way of thinking. Neo-conservatives like
Richard Perle and David Frum a couple of decades ago declared that “A free society
is a self-policing society.” This was part of a larger drive to discredit the state as a source of redress for hardships. In the United Kingdom there were similar attacks from leaders of the Tory party who desired a new focus which emphasized greater community and local government powers. This has resulted, for example, in having established food safety structures quietly dismantled.

A special correspondent for The Guardian recently wrote that “Local authorities — a crucial pillar in the edifice since they have legal responsibility for testing foods sold in their area — are so starved of money that they have cut checking to the bone.”2 The result is that the Foods Standards Agency is in the process of rewriting much of the basis of food regulation in the United Kingdom and, as a consequence, commercial interests will be protected more than consumers. Big businesses, like supermarkets, will be pleased by privatized inspection and certification schemes which will lead to more “commercially astute” understanding. (Such as covering the sale of outdated foods such as chicken products.)

Lobbyists in England, as in the US, bait lawmakers as well as the national audience with plausible concerns. They suggest that “overreaching regulations” harass start-ups and small businesses. Educational and training requirements on a number of professions impose costs on low and middle-income workers striving for better positions. The lobbyists then proposed that stripping away regulations and consumer protections are the easiest ways to lower such costs. They ignore other solutions to lower the burdensome entry costs for those educationally enrolled.

I believe that there are genuine and rational reasons to question the construction of mountains of bureaucratic regulations. Now many of these regulations reflect serious concern about the environment, worker safety, pensions, health — well, about almost everything affecting human beings. I have long felt that common sense exercised on most issues regarding human welfare would be preferable to regulatory excesses.

Federal Laws like NEPA (National Environmental Protection Act) as well as state-level regulations and rules have ensured that citizens are protected from the harms of less responsible businesses and corporations. Environmental regulations prohibit these from disposing industrial wastes irresponsibly and serve to protect the health of both workers and communities. OSHA (The Occupational Safety and Health Administration) has some 3,500 specific provisions to cover the health and safety of construction workers. Detailed regulations on electronic job injuries and illness from air pollution in the work place impose fines and other sanctions to make it costly for irresponsible parties to act recklessly. However, much of such protective regulation is currently in jeopardy. Lobbyists and opponents in Congress suggest that publicly displaying information according to the injury requirements would unfairly damage the reputation of the employers. Pushing aside concerns of dangers to workers exposed to Silica and Beryllium, President Trump has been eager to roll back the executive order by President Obama in 2014 titled “Fair Pay and Safe Workplaces.”

The neoliberal program which has been envisioned aims to switch our values of “the public good and the public interest” to a value system based on “the market” and individual responsibility. Prof Sendhill Mullainathan, an economics professor at
Harvard, suggests that “New technologies are rattling the economy on all fronts. While the predictions are specific and dire, bigger changes are surely coming. Clearly we need to adjust for the turbulence ahead.” He believes that the neoliberal agenda could give way to a new focus which will incorporate an authoritarian mode of economics aimed at accountability and the “audit culture.” Mullainathan cautions: “A lifetime of work will be a lifetime of changing, moving between firms, jobs, careers and cities.” By-passing such purportedly creative destruction, he believes “we ought to enable innovation to take its course.”3 Such excuses for the unfettered pursuit of profit would end the system of protective regulations which have taken decades to develop. It seems obvious to me that regulation is essential for the democratic state. In our daily lives we drive our cars, take our pills, drink our water, and comfortably eat most foods because we take the safety regulations covering all these acts for granted.

France’s new President, Emmanuel Macron, has said “we need to rethink regulation, so as to deal with the excesses of globalized Capitalism.”4 The devious excesses of the current economic system manifestly threaten our future. By now, it should be clear to every voter and each citizen that deregulation is generally not in the public interest and should be fiercely resisted if we truly want advancement of the common good.


1Michael W. Bauer et al. Dismantling Public Policy, (2014) pp.30-56

2Felicity Lawrence, “Vital protections in are being dismantled,” The Guardian, August 25, 2017, p.31

3Sendhill Mullainathan, “Planning to cope with what you can’t forsee,” The New York Times, September 5, 2017

4“Regeneration,” The Economist, September 30, 2017, p.12